HTTPS matters more for Chrome

HTTPS matters more for Chrome

HTTPS usage on the web has taken off as Chrome has evolved its security indicators. HTTPS has now become a requirement for many new browser features, and Chrome is dedicated to making it as easy as possible to set up HTTPS. Let’s take a look at how.

For several years, Google has moved toward a more secure web by strongly advocating that sites adopt the Secure HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTPS) encryption.

Healthcare: Prevent insider threats

Healthcare: Prevent insider threats

Healthcare is the only industry where insider threats pose the greatest threat to sensitive data, with 58 percent of security incidents coming from people working within the organization itself. Here’s a look at five ways to prevent such breaches.

#1 Educate – The workforce (meaning all healthcare employees) must be educated on allowable uses and disclosures of protected health information (PHI) and the risk associated with certain behaviors, patient privacy, and data security.

Protect your Facebook and Twitter from hackers

Protect your Facebook and Twitter from hackers

In the wake of Facebook’s worldwide privacy scandal, it’s time to revisit some social media best practices. Your information is incredibly valuable, and you can’t rely on social media platforms to keep it safe from hackers. Heed these tips to make sure your Facebook and Twitter accounts are well secured.

Should you worry about Facebook’s breach?

Should you worry about Facebook’s breach?

Facebook is the most popular platform for developing brand awareness because it allows businesses to target users based on what they have posted in the past. But after the recent data breach scandal, is your data still safe? Read on to find out if you need to worry about your privacy.

Millions more affected by Equifax leaks

Millions more affected by Equifax leaks

Back in 2017, Equifax, one of the three major credit bureaus in the US, made a major security blunder that leaked millions of sensitive information, including Social Security numbers, addresses, driver’s license numbers, and credit card details. The company estimated that the data of 145.5 million people (almost half the US population) were exposed.